Alameda County Puts Latest Phase of Reopenings on Pause as Coronavirus Cases See Spike

Published On June 30, 2020 | By Rob Arias | Coronavirus, News & Commentary

Alameda County officials are reversing their plan to move the county to greater socialization and business activity citing a spike in hospitalizations and a rising rate of cases of the novel coronavirus.

In-store retail and outdoor dining was given the green light to reopen back on June 18. The next phase, referred to as “Phase 3,” would allow indoor dining, bars, hair salons & barbershops and pools.

“[We’re] not closing anything that’s already open, but not moving forward yet with any additional reopenings at this time,” they clarified in a reply.


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Public health officials said that the number of coronavirus cases has risen in the last week to 71.1 per 100,000 people from 63.2. Hospitalizations have been rising daily since June 22. Before then hospitalizations were falling in number.

Alameda County health officials rely on the following data indicators to measure our progress against the pandemic:

  1. Rates of new cases and hospitalizations
  2. Hospital inpatient bed capacity and surge capacity
  3. Testing capacity
  4. Disease containment capacity
  5. Supply of personal protective equipment for health care providers

While indicators 2, 3, 4, and 5 have moved in the positive direction or remained stable over the past several weeks, we are seeing unfavorable trends for cases and hospitalizations.

Cases in the 94608 zip code had not seen more than a six case week-to-week increase since this data began being provided. In the past two weeks, we’ve seen a 22 cumulative case increase.

Emeryville was listed as under 10 cases until the week of June 15th. Our city now has 20 reported cases.

Alameda County has the most number of cases in the Bay Area. Moving to the next phase would align the county more with the state’s pace for reopening, but the county must show that it’s safe to do so, public health officials said.

This AC-HCS website contains two dashboards including cases & case rates over time, by gender, age group, and city and a second that includes deaths by race ethnicity, hospitalizations, and cases and case rates by zip code. It is updated in real-time.

Read the full Press Release on acphd.org →

About The Author

is a third generation Californian and East Bay native who moved to Emeryville in 2003. A new parent in the community, he can often be seen walking his French Bulldog rescue "Fiona" around his Park Avenue District neighborhood, traversing the greenway on his bike or enjoying his favorite Emeryville small businesses. Rob's "day job" is as a creative professional.

4 Responses to Alameda County Puts Latest Phase of Reopenings on Pause as Coronavirus Cases See Spike

  1. Ryan Thurman says:

    Hooray for economic collapse. I for one welcome the upcoming dark age of strict government oversight. The government knows whats best for me and my family and I should give them all my money so they may solve the COVID issue once and for all.

  2. MSM profiting from the fear mongering. Government workers don't care - they are still receiving paychecks. says:

    1) Yes, the number of cases is rising. Because they are taking more tests. 20% of the COVID positive patients in the hospitals are there for things completely unrelated to COVID. It could be a broken leg, it could have been a gunshot wound. The patients had no idea they had COVID. Data for California as of June 30, 2020:
    tests 10,001 / 100,000 population
    cases 544* / 100,000 population (counts all positives)
    deaths 15** / 100,000 population (inflated to receive reimbursement)

    2) Yes, hospitalizations are rising, but it’s in part due to the treatment protocol (Remdesivir) which is an infusion therapy and it requires a long hospital stay to complete the therapy. Hospitalization numbers are reported as current, not new daily changes, so the longer stays results into higher numbers.

    3) The median age of new cases is 35. (same age as the looters?) Early in this crisis, it was in the 60s. Comorbidity was a legitimate concern.

    4) Back in April – 50% of the COVID patients were on ventilators. Today, it’s just 3%. The peak in daily deaths was way back in early April.

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