Uniqlo Japanese casual wear coming to Bay Street

Published On September 24, 2013 | By William He | In the Neighborhood, Local Businesses

New York City, San Francisco, and now Emeryville – the famous Japanese retailer Uniqlo (Unique Clothing) is coming to Bay Street on November 1st. While the Japanese giant is the 4th largest clothing retailer in the world, not many people know about this hip place. Their philosophy is to sell simple, sturdy, every day clothes. These are not the pieces that would make you stand out, but instead the kind of collared shirt you’d buy for the office. But it’s good to know that you can count on that Uniqlo oxford shirt.

My first encounter with Uniqlo was nine years ago when I was a study-abroad student in Japan. Uniqlo was just starting out and they had T-shirts for 10 dollars and chinos for 30. They had well-designed aisles and friendly service. I’m just glad that I don’t have to buy a plane ticket to Tokyo anymore.

Uniqlo will take over parts of Barnes & Noble’s first floor, all of the former Sunglass Hut, and all of the former Magnolia Hi-Fi. The store will be right under the AMC ticket booths. Uniqlo plans to add four more stores to the West Coast before Christmas.

No longer need to go to SF for your fix of Japanese jeans and oxfords!

Per this Bay Street Press Release:

Our clothes are functional, designed with innovative features and available in a wide range of colors and styles. Our designers are artistic apparel engineers, dedicated to finding elegant solutions to common garment dilemmas. We now operate more than 1,200 stores across 13 countries including our West Coast Flagship location in San Francisco’s Union Square. This fall we will have 17 stores in the US with the addition of our Bay Street location.

Further Reading:

Uniqlo pins hopes on Bay Area with 4 new stores | SF Gate →

About The Author

is a city planner for the City of American Canyon. He grew up in Oakland and moved to Emeryville in 2011. He has a Master's Degree in Urban Planning from San Jose State University and completed his thesis on the impact of redevelopment projects in Emeryville. His interests include community planning, land use optimization, and urban design. William lives with his wife in the Park Avenue District and enjoys photography and traveling on his spare time.

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