• “cp-mark-morris-lb-ad”

History & Archive

If you happen to be arrested or detained in Emeryville, you’ll likely be transported to an Oakland or County jail. The reasons are that the Emeryville Police Station no longer has a holding facility. They...

Read More →

If you’ve lived in Emeryville long enough, you’ve probably stumbled upon the monthly Porsche meetups on Harlan Street near the Pixar gate and wandered by to see what was going on. Chances are you were...

Read More →

When all is said and done, Ken Bukowski will go down as one of the most colorful characters our city has ever seen. A six term, 24 year Council member and five-time Mayor, plaques with...

Read More →

Golden Gate Key & Lock holds an impressive legacy that may have been overlooked by residents of Emeryville. The African-American owned business goes back 72 years and three generations. They have witnessed massive changes in...

Read More →

Jackie Robinson is generally credited with breaking the modern color line by being the first black player to play in the 20th Century. Robinson took the field for the Montreal Royals of the International league in...

Read More →

A UC Berkeley Medical student, a corpse, and an attempt to “reanimate” the dead with electricity in a rented Emeryville Warehouse. An E’ville urban legend that has never been proven … or disproven. In a letter...

Read More →

Sports Illustrated’s ‘Vault’ is an archive of articles curated by the editors of the legendary sports magazine that has been in circulation since 1954. Three articles have been republished online recently that touch on stories...

Read More →

Most of us know of The Townhouse’s historic role as “City Hall East” for the notorious ex-Chief of police John LaCoste. During this era spanning the 70’s and early 80’s, “Vernetti’s Townhouse” was more of...

Read More →

Wednesday marked a somber anniversary that may have been lost on most newer Oakland and Emeryville residents. 10 years ago, on August 2, 2007, 57-year-old Oakland Post editor Chauncey Bailey was gunned down in broad...

Read More →

East Bay Yesterday, a podcast “about history, but it’s not stuck in the past,” emerged last year and has gained the curiosity and admiration of local history buffs. Creator Liam O’Donoghue has quickly built a library of important stories cataloguing East Bay history....

Read More →

Emeryville Historical Society contributor Richard Ambro recently passed away at the age of 73. He resided in Emeryville’s Triangle neighborhood up until his sudden passing. To honor him, we have received permission from the Emeryville...

Read More →

For a city so rich in history, I’m often perplexed why Emeryville’s History is so buried. We have no museum, historical places are often unmarked and online resources are few. In fact, if you want to learn...

Read More →

His name is unforgettable, and so is his art. Mark Bulwinkle is the artist behind those whimsical steel plate silhouettes scattered around the East Bay Bridge Shopping Center. His “The Traffic Jam” pieces are arguably the lone bright spot...

Read More →

It’s easy to take for granted the Emeryville Shoreline and the beauty it brings to our city. We also take for granted the personal sacrifices and determination of those that fought to save this valuable land during...

Read More →

The Compound Gallery will be kicking off a seven week retrospective of the work of Tyler Hoare AKA “The Red Baron” this Saturday March 18th. Hoare’s famous WWI biplane installations have anonymously adorned the Emeryville & Berkeley Marinas...

Read More →

The University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) launched a region-wide celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love with its exhibit “Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia.” The...

Read More →

The Planning Commission will hold a study session tonight to review a proposal by PG&E to demolish the 17,000 sq. ft. “Laboratory” building at the corner of Hollis & 45th. A building that is part of an existing PG&E transformer...

Read More →

A 1986 video segment recently surfaced on YouTube of a KGO Channel 7 news segment detailing the sudden closing of Judson Steel thirty years ago. News anchor Van Amburg began the segment by reporting “the end of an...

Read More →

The Emeryville Mudflat Sculptures were an anonymous folk art sculpture garden that utilized trash and driftwood as its medium for public art. Considering how it was constructed and the materials used, its power and intent were ultimately to...

Read More →

A former Emeryville Police Officer convicted of rape in 1989 is set for a Parole hearing after spending the past 27 years in prison. According to the East Bay Times story, Ron Roy Choss was convicted of...

Read More →

In the face of great uncertainty, fear, and cultural upheaval that plagued the 1960s an art movement bloomed that inspired millions. Starting in 1964, the Emeryville mudflats along Interstate 80 were home to a sculpture...

Read More →

Another tale that fortified Emeryville’s well-earned “Rotten City” era reputation has been unearthed by East Bay Times reporter Peter Hegarty. Amateur historian Alfred Janske pieced the story of a fallen lawman together by flipping thorough handwritten records, ancestry...

Read More →

Most people who have heard of the Emeryville Mudflat Sculptures know very little about them. If you have seen pictures of them, you are left with the question; “who made these things and why?” A random...

Read More →

As the 2016 baseball season kicks into full swing, it’s a great time to remind residents of Emeryville’s rich baseball history. East Bay baseball has its heart and soul in Emeryville as the home of the Oakland Oaks from...

Read More →